API Platform: A Framework for API-driven Projects (DevTalks Bucharest slides)

Here the slide deck I presented during DevTalks Bucharest 2018.

It covers the main features of the API Platform framework: we will install the framework, design an API data model as a set of tiny plain old PHP classes and learn how to get:

  • A fully featured dev environment with Symfony Flex and React containers, HTTP/2 and HTTPS support and a cache proxy
  • Pagination, data validation, access control, relation embedding, filters and error handling
  • Support for modern REST API formats: JSON-LD/Hydra, OpenAPI/Swagger, JSONAPI, HAL, JSON…
  • GraphQL support
  • An API responding in a just few milliseconds thanks to the builtin invalidation based cache mechanism
  • A dynamically created Material Design admin interface (a la Sonata / EasyAdmin – but 100% client-side) built with React
  • Client apps skeletons: React/Redux, React Native, Vue.js, Angular…

Finally, we’ll see ho to deploy the project in 1 command on Google Container Engine or any cloud with a Kubernetes.

This is an updated version of the talk I did during the SymfonyLive London 2017 conference, demonstrating the latest features of API Platform, and adapted to target a broader, non-Symfony/PHP audience.

API Platform 2.2: GraphQL, JSON API, React admin and PWA, Kubernetes instant deployment and many more new features


I’m glad to announce the immediate availability of API Platform 2.2 beta 1. This is a huge release that comes with a lot of exciting features including (but not limited too):

  • GraphQL and JSON API support
  • Symfony 4 / Flex integration
  • API Platform Admin integration (built with ReactJS and Admin On Rest)
  • ReactJS and Vue.js Progressive Web App generators integration (a React Native app generator is also available)
  • Revamped Docker containers for both PHP and JavaScript components, including out of the box support for HTTP2, HTTPS and a built-in invalidation-based cache mechanism using Varnish
  • The ability to deploy in seconds in any Kubernetes cluster
  • A new, super-easy, way to register filters through annotations
  • And literally dozens of developer experience, performance and quality improvements

V2.2 will definitely be the best version of API Platform, and is probably the most advanced “full-stack” solution to create API-driven projects. The paradigm shift introduced by this new version has been detailed in my talk during the SymfonyCon 2017.

It took 6 months and 483 commits from more than 60 contributors to craft this version. The documentation has also been dramatically improved, even if some work is still to do (upgrading the getting started guide and migrating all articles to the new Flex directory structure, finish to document some new features).

Thank you very much to all contributors of the project! You rock!

Let’s see more in depth all of these new features:

The New Distribution

The easiest way to get started with API Platform has always been to use the provided Docker setup. In version 2.2, the Docker configuration has been totally redesigned to fit with the new features provided by Symfony Flex and to integrate our JavaScript components.

To get started:

You get:

– An API skeleton following the Flex directory structure. Just add classes representing your public data model (see the example below) to get a working hypermedia and/or GraphQL web API.

The API is available in HTTP/2 and HTTPS thanks to the provided development proxy. It also automatically benefits from the API Platform’s built-in cache mechanism (the Varnish container is also provided). CORS headers are automatically configured. As you can see, the nice documentation is – of course – still available if you open the entrypoint in a browser.

– A ReactJS Progressive Web App skeleton with a fancy welcome page designed by Laury Sorriaux:

Execute  docker-compose exec client generate-api-platform-client to bootstrap a nice and fully-featured Progressive Web App (that can even work offline) using React, Redux and Bootstrap 4 and respecting accessibility recommendations.

To generate the PWA, the tool parses the API hypermedia description automatically generated in the Hydra format by the API component. This generator can work with any server exposing a Hydra documentation (done with API Platform or not).

The tool also has Vue.js, React Native and TypeScript skeletons thanks to the great contributions of Alain Hippolyte, Piotr Synowiec and Antoine Bluchet.

Read the full documentation of the API Platform Client Generator.

– Last but not least, a dynamically generated admin for the API is also automatically available:

Like the client generator, the API Platform Admin component also leverages the Hydra documentation to automatically guess the structure of the data exposed by the API.

Because it is built on top of React and Admin On Rest (aka React Admin), the UI is fully customizable.

Morgan Auchedé is the new maintainer of this component, and has greatly improved it since its initial release.

– In this version of API Platform, the MySQL container has been replaced by a Postgres one.

Instant Kubernetes Deployment

Kubernetes has become the most popular way to deploy, run and manage containers in production. Both Google Cloud Platform, Microsoft Azure and Amazon Web Services provide managed Kubernetes environment.

API Platform 2.2 contains a built-in Helm (the k8s package manager) chart to deploy with ease:

Your app is now up and running in a managed cluster! Read the related documentation to learn more about the Kubernetes support.

GraphQL Support

GraphQL is a query language for APIs designed by Facebook that is becoming a very popular alternative to the REST pattern. GraphQL support has been the most wanted feature for a while, it is now fully implemented!

The new GraphQL subsystem of API Platform now supports:

To enable the GraphQL support, you just have to install the GraphQL PHP library:

Then, create an API Platform entity, as usual:

Yes, both GraphQL and REST formats can be used for the same entity! Thanks to API Platform’s hypermedia support, you can even run a GraphQL request, then apply REST operations to the retrieved resources using their IRIs! The best of both worlds.

Your GraphQL API is ready! Browse https://localhost:8443/graphql :

There is a lot to say about the GraphQL support, how to use it in collaboration with REST and how to apply fine-grained configurations. I’ll write a follow-up post dedicated to it, stay tuned!

The GraphQL support is an important team work of Raoul Clais, Alan Poulain, Baptiste Meyer and myself.

JSON API Support

JSON API is a rising, well designed, hypermedia format. Unlike JSON-LD (the default format exposed by API Platform), it’s not a web standard; and it has less features but it is also simpler to learn and understand.

With API Platform 2.2, you don’t have to choose, you can have both! And even more because API Platform supports out of the box JSON-LD/Hydra, HAL, JSON API, YAML, XML, raw JSON and as we’ve seen just before, GraphQL.

To enable JSON API, add the following config:

Easy enough?

The JSON API support has been contributed by Hamza Amrouche, Hector Hurtarte and Baptiste Meyer.

Declaring API Filters Using Annotations

The API Platform filtering system is very powerful. It contains a lot of built-in filters and can easily be extended. However, until now, it wasn’t really easy to configure: it was requiring to declare services manually.

Because Symfony Flex is all about service autowiring and autoconfiguration, simplifying the filters configuration was a top priority task.

Hopefully, Antoine Bluchet created a nice way to do it using annotations:

Nothing more! You can now filter the collection of organizations by the name  property, both with REST and GraphQL!

In addition to these main features, a lot of other configuration options and various improvements have been introduced. Read the full changelogs for more information:

Help Us: Test, Star, Spread the Word!

If you have some existing API Platform projects, or if you want to give a try to the framework, please test this new version and report any problem on our GitHub issue tracker!

If you like API Platform, please tell the world and give us a star on GitHub.

Since API Platform 2.2, the Symfony Thanks command is also shipped with API Platform. Thanks to this tool, you can send a star to all the PHP libraries you use in your project (including API Platform) by simply running: docker-compose exec php composer thanks

If you want to learn API Platform, come to one of the workshops organized during these upcoming tech conferences:

[SymfonyCon] API Platform and Symfony: a Framework for API-driven Projects

Here are the slides of my talk during the Symfony Con Cluj. You can rate this talk on joind.in.

Install API Platform. Design the API data model as a set of tiny plain old PHP classes. Instantly get:

  • Fully featured dev environment with Symfony Flex and React containers, HTTP/2 and HTTPS support and a cache proxy
  • Pagination, data validation, access control, relation embedding, filters and error handling
  • Support for modern REST API formats: JSON-LD/Hydra, OpenAPI/Swagger, JSONAPI, HAL, JSON…
  • GraphQL support
  • An API responding in a just few milliseconds thanks to the builtin invalidation based cache mechanism
  • A dynamically created Material Design admini interface (a la Sonata / EasyAdmin – but 100% client-side) built with React.
  • Client apps skeletons: React/Redux, React Native, Vue.js, Angular…
  • Finally, deploy in 1 command on Google Container Engine or any cloud with a Kubernetes instance with the provided Helm chart.

Yes, you just need is describing a data model, just a few line of codes to get all of that!

API Platform Admin 0.2: an admin in 1 minute for your API (React Progressive Web App)

The version 0.2 of the API Platform‘s admin component has just been released!

This nice tool allows to automatically and dynamically build a fully featured administration interface (CRUD, pagination, relations…) for any API supporting the Hydra hypermedia vocabulary (more formats supported soon, see at the end of this article). 0 line of code required!

API Platform Admin is built with React on top of the famous Admin On Rest library as a Progressive Web App.

Let’s discover the bunch of new features that this version brings.

Getting Started

Assuming that you have an API exposing a Hydra documentation, you just have to initialize the following React component to get your admin:

For instance, create a new app with Facebook’s create-react-app, replace the content of src/App.js with the previous snippet and run yarn add @api-platform/admin. You’re done!

If you get an error related to multiple versions of React being loaded, just remove the react and react-dom packages from your project’s package.json and run yarn install again.

If you don’t have a JSON-LD / Hydra API yet, here is the code of the one I’ll use in the following examples. This API has been created using the API Platform’s distribution:

Yes, you just need those two tiny PHP classes to get a hypermedia API. Learn more about the API component by reading the getting started guide. But, really, any API with a Hydra documentation will do the job regardless of the server-side programming language.

Native Support for to-Many Relations

API Platform Admin supports to-one relations since its very first release. However it was mandatory to customize the component used for to-many relations. This isn’t the case anymore. Our API documentation parser gained support for cardinalities and can now extract them if the API documentation includes OWL’s maxCardinality properties.

If no cardinality is provided, the admin will use a to-many widget by default.

Thanks to this new feature, here is how the edition screen of the Person resource looks like this:

The admin is able to guess that the Person resource is related to many Greeting ones and use the appropriate Admin On Rest component.

Detection of More Schema.org’s Types (name, url and email)

API Platform Admin is able to guess the widget to use depending of the type of a resource’s property. It supports:

  • Numbers (http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema#float and http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema#integer ranges)
  • Dates (http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema#date and http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema#dateTime ranges)
  • Booleans (http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema#boolean range)
  • And of course text fields

In this new release, Admin also supports some types of the popular Schema.org vocabulary:

  • As shown in the previous screenshots (e.g. Greetings select box), if a property has the type http://schema.org/name, this property will be used instead of the ID when displaying this relation
  • If a property has the type http://schema.org/url, the URL will be clickable when displayed in the admin
  • If a property has the type http://schema.org/email, the HTML input will be of type email and a basic validation will occur (this was already working in v0.1)

Support for Read-only Resources

The version 0.1 wasn’t able to deal with read-only resource (no POST nor PUT operation). We have improved the API doc parser to support owl:equivalentClass properties. Now, if the API documentation provide those properties, the admin will be builded even if the resource is read-only (of course in this case you will only be able to browse resources, and not to edit them).

Easier and Deeper Customization

Morgan Auchedé did an excellent work to make the Admin fully and easily customizable. You can now override any generated React component by a custom one, or one from Admin On Rest, or from MUI React. You can just replace (or ad, or remove) a specific input or field. But you can also replace a whole list, a show view, a creation or edition form or a remove button.

Here is an example of full customization, courtesy of Morgan:

Ability to Support Other Formats Such as GraphQL

The parser has been designed to be able to be parse other formats such as a GraphQL schema or Swagger/Open API. The api-doc-parser library provides an intermediate representation that is populated by the specific format parser. It’s this representation that is used by the parser as well as by our React and Vue.js Progressive Web App generator.

It means that when converters from other formats than Hydra to this intermediate representation will be available (Pull Requests welcome), both tools we’ll support those formats. As you may know, the server part of API Platform now supports GraphQL. You can guess which format we’ll implement next in the api-doc-parser!